"Horizons," at the Cheryl Hazen Gallery, showcases three artists: Russell Sharon, Jeff Muhs, and Bradley Narduzzi Rex. The exhibit investigates the divergence of space and the significance of different elements coexisting harmoniously.


Visit PS3's newest exhibition, ARTPARK, a pop-up and benefit for the Arts' school. Curated by Laurie De Chiara from ArtPod.org, the interactive show will feature an auction, original works in limited quantities, hands-on workshops with artists, and a lovely gathering with refreshments. Running through 30th. The Opening Reception will be on March 22nd, 4-7p.m.


The Art of Intelligence is part of our ongoing series committed to providing a venue for the creative talents among our Intelligence professionals who work to make our lives safer— and, whose families are often in need of assistance. "Rainy Street" is a poem by U.S. Army Intelligence Officer John W. Davis about his cousin, Pat, who will be forever eight years old. 


Opening tonight, master stencil artist and crazy urban explorer Logan Hicks' upcoming solo show, "Love Never Saved Anything," (he's so emo) is his probably most personal yet. The new body of work includes a series of underwater paintings and old(er) urban exploration photos including the time he climbed out on the eagles on the Chrysler Building. Logan is well-known for his work as a street artist and urban explorer, seeking out and discovering places that few have seen. From abandoned subway stations to dilapidated buildings, a series of new photographs will be showcased depicting forbidden areas of the urban environment and unique vantage points


Primarily based on the relationship between the body and the execution of performance, Leftover of Endurance is a case study of the radical transformation of the social structures. It deals with notions of presence, endurance, devotion, space, time, change, movement, and choreography, questioning-among other things-social and gender hierarchies. The exhibition runs March 8th through April 12th.


Opening on Wednesday, February 19th, City Stages offers a paean to the craft and visionary potential of large-format, black-and-white photography, as well as to the vibrancy of the cultural landscape at a transitional moment--a moment in which our very relationship to that landscape is increasingly mediated by omnipresent screens.


In a medium that by the end of the century was largely taken over by photographers looking in, Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Frank, looked out.  The two indisputable two giants, both “outsiders,” were vocally ‘rivals’ and publicly dismissive the other’s work.  Yet, neither’s influence can be denied.  Within a six year period of time they published what are arguably the two most influential books in the history of photography - Cartier-Bresson’s “The Decisive Moment” (1952) and Frank’s “The Americans” (1958). Through March 24th, “The Heart and the Eye: Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Frank in the World" at the Danziger Gallery celebrates the artistry of both and remembers an era that begs to be told.  

British-born, Los Angeles-based painter Kour Pour's first solo exhibition features Portuguese sailors trailing the Silk Road, Chinese dragons and flying horses, Indian warriors and Buddha-like figures, and floral patterns reminiscent of William Morris. For Kour Pour, Persian carpets aren't simply decorative artifacts; his meticulous and attentive selection of rugs dating from the 16th century to the 1960s traces a history of the modern age. Through February 23rd.


At the center point of Jane Kent’s solo exhibition, on view through February 16th, are two new silkscreen prints, one titled Pink Eye and the other Blue Nose.  Kent uses unfolded cardboard boxes as templates for her silkscreen construction that are unabashedly colorful, with layered assemblies of rectangles and punctuated by flat, carefully errant marks and brushstrokes. Kent’s prints and drawings unfold in a precise dialogue of silhouettes and juxtaposed shapes. Stretching and elongating forms often within a strict frame, whether painted, printed or both, Kent torques pictorial
space.  Check it out!!


NYC Parks will celebrate the holiday season with its 31st annual exhibition of unique, unconventional wreaths. A diverse selection of 46 fine artists, horticulturalists, designers, and other spirited contributors enliven this ageless holiday symbol. Materials such as neck ties, rat traps, acorns, and recycled plastic bags are used to examine themes as diverse as zombie apocalypses to water conservation. It is sure to be an imaginative and enjoyable experience this year's holiday season.


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