As the new condo buildings rise in SoHo, the historical perspective as to how we got here fades. Few of the swells dropping seven and even eight figure checks on the table for their new digs have much knowledge about why SoHo really is SoHo. Yes, they might know that the acronym stands for south of Houston Street, and that Warhol and Castelli were on West Broadway around the same time in the 70's, but what about the raw lofts, fixture fees and guerrilla art?


 The sparse SoHo street art exhibits are more low-key now. Fewer artists exhibit their work than in the eighties and nineties when residents were up in arms over the crowded sidewalks. 


The crowds don’t start until some time around noon. So, it seemed like a good time to walk along West Broadway. The vendors and artists that line the sidewalks from Broome to Houston Streets used to start shortly after 8 a.m. but even at 10:00 a.m. it was certainly not crowded. Some of the artists have headed to the High Line while others have left SoHo for other parts of the country but there are still a few familiar faces. 


The Greenwich Village Antiquarian Book Fair celebrates its 36th year on Friday, February 20th through Sunday, February 22nd at P.S. 3 in the West Village.  The 3-day event offers both the serious bibliophile and the casual browser a delightful opportunity to peruse rare and vintage books! 


When the phrase “Holy Days” appears, it has a sombre quality. It elicits images of tranquil, serious contemplation – a time set aside to appreciate the gift of Life, and to clear one's soul of rancor and resentment. In direct contrast, the word, “Holiday” a clear derivative, brings forth visions of celebration, feasting ... PRESENTS!


One of our favorites out right now is “Ansel Adams: Classic Images” at Robert Mann Gallery. Presenting some of both Adams' best-known photographs as well as stellar lesser-seen works—including several vintage prints dating back to the artist's very early career in the 1920s—this collection by the legendary photographer spans the grand scope of his Western landscapes.


One of our favorites, Kent Fine Art opens it’s fall season with FLEX, curated by Orlando Tirado. The exhibition explores shape, mass, and form of the body in relation to an emerging queer, transgender, renegade post-minimalist strategy that strips the body of its flesh, framework, and constraints.


We, The Outsiders brings together works by an international quartet of artists, and will be on view through October 31. It’s an art exhibition that explores several perplexing questions: “Can it be said that art has a consciousness of its own? And if such a consciousness were independent of us, where would it place us in relation to itself?” The exhibition revolves around a gigantic egg—which probes, like the classic chicken-and-the-egg conundrum where consciousness begins and ends when it comes to art.


KITEYA is known for featuring items that demonstrate the craftsmanship, aesthetic, and artistry of both traditional and modern Japanese culture. Their latest exhibit, featuring the calligraphy works of Yasuko Kuboyama, is no exception. Born in Fukuoka, Japan, Ms. Kuboyama has made a name for herself with her bold, creative calligraphy and large-scale works. The exhibit (September 28 - October 27) will kick off with a special reception on October 1st at 5pm, featuring a raffle, a calligraphy performance by Yasuko Kuboyama, and refreshments by Sennari, Sanseido Honpo, and Ureshi no Cha.


Over the past three years a small community of introspective frontier feminists have been gathering on intensive retreats to discuss and dissect the tenets of what it means to be a modern feminist. Presented by The Hole, “Future Feminism” is an exhibition collectively realized by Antony, Kembra Pfahler, Johanna Constantine, Bianca Casady and Sierra Casady. It realizes their reflective journeys into 13 tenets, articulating their meditations on modern feminist thinking. (Running September 11—27, 2014)


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