Books

 

While residing in a post-World War II displaced persons camp in 1945, a Ukrainian refugee by the name of Ihor Shevchenko discovered George Orwell's anti-communist novel, Animal Farm, and was fascinated by its message. With Orwell's permission and encouragement, he translated the book into Ukrainian under the pseudonym Ivan Cherniatynskyi and published it for distribution to other refugees. This story, and its aftermath, is told by Andrea Chalupa in her book Orwell and the Refugees: The Untold Story of Animal Farm.  Meet Andrea Chalupa on November 15th. She will speak about her book, life in the DP camps, Ihor Shevchenko, and George Orwell. Copies will be available for purchase and signing by the author. 

 


The Art of Intelligence is part of our ongoing series committed to providing a venue for the creative talents among our Intelligence professionals who work to make our lives safer— and, whose families are often in need of assistance. You may contribute to those currently serving our country or to the families of fallen heroes at https://www.afio.com/donations.htm.


This weekend make a pilgrimage to “Build a City of Poems: An Interactive Exhibition of Poetry and Art" created by downtown elementary school students and murals from the Community Word Project. Visitors of all ages are invited to come out to Governors Island to contribute their own drawings and poetry, filling in the outline of a gigantic cityscape mural created by artist Felipe Galindo.


Join Gabrielle Seltz TODAY for a reading and discussion from her new book with the great Frederic Tuten, author, most recently, of Self-Portraits: Fictions. In 1958, Selz moved to New York, where her father, Peter Selz, would begin his job as the chief curator of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art. He would carry on to champion a generation of modern artists, some the most celebrated of the day: Rothko, de Kooning, and Tinguely.


For years I would look at people, places and things, always finding fault. I would zero in on details that I believed should be different and wondered why they didn't correspond to what I believed was the “right” way. We often are told that age brings wisdom. Of course, with my obsession for being youthful, wisdom felt like a booby prize. Now, happily, that is no longer the case. It occurred to me that my style of seeing that things that should be done “my way” was robbing me of the opportunity to view life through the eyes of others.


It may be rainy today, but it will be gorgeous this weekend. Check out McNally Jacskon's Storytime at the Elizabeth Street Garden, and meet author Richard T. Morris; or rather, they can meet a moose pretending to be R. T. Morris; or perhaps it's really an author named Richard masquerading as a moose--which is perfect for a fabulous new book called This Is A Moose, written by Richard T. Morris and illustrated by award-winning artist Tom Lichtenheld.


Join avid Middle School readers for an evening of four superlative authors writing for middle grade audiences. Tony Abbott is the author of The Secrets of Droon, Firegirl, and, most recently, The Copernicus Legacy. Over 12 million copies of his books have been sold worldwide. Christopher Healy is the author of The Hero's Guide to Saving Your Kingdom, The Hero's Guide to Storming the Castle, and The Hero's Guide to Being an Outlaw.


The Art of Intelligence is part of our ongoing series committed to providing a venue for the creative talents among our Intelligence professionals who work to make our lives safer— and, whose families are often in need of assistance. You may contribute to those currently serving our country or to the families of fallen heroes at https://www.afio.com/donations.htm.


The Art of Intelligence is part of our ongoing series committed to providing a venue for the creative talents among our Intelligence professionals who work to make our lives safer— and, whose families are often in need of assistance. "Rainy Street" is a poem by U.S. Army Intelligence Officer John W. Davis about his cousin, Pat, who will be forever eight years old. 


On Friday, March 7th see Charles Calomiris discuss his book, "Fragile by Design," a revealing exploration of the ways that politics inevitably intrude into bank regulation. The book combines political history and economics to examine how coalitions of politicians, bankers and other interest groups form, why some endure while others are undermined and how they generate policies that determine who gets to be a banker, who has access to credit and who pays for bank bailouts and rescues.


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