Cinema / Theater

The heroes of Tiger & Bunny are back for a special limited engagement on March 15 &17 in an all-new feature length film. In this anime, the city of Stern Bild is protected by corporate superheroes who fight crime while promoting their sponsors on HERO TV. Kotetsu T. Kaburagi, a.k.a. Wild Tiger, and Barnaby Brooks Jr.'s partnership comes to a sudden end when Kotetsu is fired and Barnaby is paired up with Golden Ryan, a new hero with awesome powers and a huge ego to match. When they are sent to investigate a string of strange incidents, they discover three superpowered NEXTs plotting to bring terror and destruction. 


Beginning January 24th, two of Chicago's most highly regarded Second City veterans, TJJagodowski and Dave Pasquesi, will be entertaining New York audiences with their brand of long-form improvisation. Fans of TJ and Dave forever marvel at their technique, mental dexterity, and uncanny ability to create incredible, hour-long instant plays out of thin air.  Laughter always is the best medicine.


The cliché of stiff-upper-lip Britons who rarely show emotion is beautifully discredited in the Roundabout Theatre Company’s new production of Terence Rattigan’s The Winslow Boy in association with The Old Vic, directed by Lindsay Posner. Rattigan, a pillar of British theatre in the mid-twentieth century, managed to find the heartbeat under the calm continence of his characters. Rattigan’s case is helped by the stellar cast of this revival who give life to the Winslow family’s problems and feelings, sustained by Peter McKintosh’s sumptuously upper middle class set and costumes that tell as much about the characters as the writing and the acting.


The Rocky Horror Show had its debut on the London stage in 1973 and within a month it was an underground sensation. In less than a year it played to sold out audiences at the La Roxy. In 1975, the play was turned into a film. Almost 40 years later is has become the biggest cult movie in history. On Thursday, October 31st, Halloween Night, The Rocky Horror Show will be resurrected for a one night (2 performance) extravaganza at Duane Park restaurant in the east village.


Set in a purgatory cell the day after the protagonist’s death, For the Sins I Can Remember, opening on October 4th, is a devised, absurdist portrait of the women of the American Victorian Era who chose to work as prostitutes. Inspired by the letters of prostitute Maimie Pinzer and the world of Brechtian farce, the piece illuminates a woman’s march across the fires of morality, love, and femininity. 


"Women or Nothing" about two women so desperate to have a child that one of them will even sleep with a man.  Who the man is, what he thinks is going on, what the women think about what he thinks, and what the mother of one of the women reveals about her own colorful past—it all defies belief. Why then does it all make sense? Extended through October 13th.


Conor McPherson’s "The Weir" has been extended through September 15th. It takes place in a remote country pub in Ireland, where newcomer Valerie arrives and becomes spellbound by an evening of ghostly stories told by the local bachelors who drink there.


About racism, nationalism, sexism, and materialism, check out a screening of the filmed conversation of Tibet scholar Robert Thurman and analyst Jane Selinske on Monday, September 2nd.  Said Thurman, “We have not yet made peace with a land we took by force and have only partly paid for.” 


In the private crisis of 1910 bohemians, each struggling to live creatively in a restrained world, the play, opening September 14th, confronts enduring double standards, the barriers to transcending social mores, the compromises faced by the artistically ambitious, and the torment of ideal love residing in human hearts.


To commemorate the bones of Richard III being found in an English parking lot, The Drilling Company will present Shakespeare's tragedy of the crook-back king through August 16th


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