Cinema / Theater

This one-night-only performance allows New York City audiences the rare opportunity to experience a traditional Javanese shadow-puppet play, featuring one of the most exciting and renowned artists performing today. Ki Purbo Asmoro combines the skill of a supreme master with the voice of a poet and the energy of a rock star. His performances often have audiences of several thousand in Java, where he is known for his ability to present ancient stories with contemporary nuance and topical humor.


Seatbelts everyone! The Magic School Bus celebrates its 25th Anniversary with an all-new musical adventure. Ms. Frizzle’s students are putting on a play about global warming, and they need some cold, hard facts. This is no ordinary field trip, as a hop on the Magic School Bus takes the class and the audience on a whirlwind tour. From the arctic to the equator, they see telltale signs of climate change and learn how conservation, recycling and alternative energy can make a difference. Ms Frizzle and her class are up for the climate challenge. Are you?


Conceived and Created by Sarah Provost and Lake Simons and hosted by Mabou Mines, Electric Bathing takes place in Coney Island circa 1910. Two garment factory workers escape from respectability into a world of fantasy where shirtwaists become kites, fans transform into seagulls, hatboxes are rides, spools of thread are anchors, and ropes are the ocean tide.


Story Pirates don't dress as pirates or make anybody walk the plank, but they do steal: they take their inspiration from kids themselves, creating an entire show adapted from stories penned by authors under the age of 12.


St. Malachy’s – The Actors’ Chapel will host a benefit concert, ‘Look at the World’, on Presidents Day. The charitable event, featuring performances by Broadway’s “Phantom of the Opera” star David Cryer, American soprano Diane Simet, and a 200-person choir, aims to raise funds for the Actors’ Chapel ministries in support of the surrounding Broadway community.


Housing Works Bookstore presents an intimate benefit evening with Lost in the Trees, orchestral folk from North Carolina.  Lush clusters of piano, a mysterious sound that might be something being unwrapped, or paper crushed for kindling, and A Church That Fits Our Needs, the second album by North Carolina group Lost in the Trees, is underway, announcing itself as a work of vaulting ambition, a cathedral built on loss and transformation.  


Critically acclaimed, Samuel & Alasdair: A Personal History of the Robot War details an alternate global history, the cold war was decided not by détente, not by nuclear holocaust, but by massive robot invasion. Among the survivors, a team of Russian radio hosts, warmed to a lost culture of 1950s Americana, broadcast a story of brothers’ love drawn straight from the American heartland. Samuel & Alasdair: A Personal History of the Robot War combines 1950s radio drama, vintage country music, and Soviet science in a sci-fi surrealist War of the Worlds meets A Prairie Home Companion examination of American nostalgia.


In the 1800’s Charles Dickens came through the neighborhood where the Canal Park Playhouse is situated, telling a brand new story of Bob Cratchet and Ebeneezer Scrooge. 200 years later, some think the ghost of Dickens has come back to share his story with us and some think actor Jimmy Kieffer has channeled his spirit to tell this holiday tale. See the show and decide for yourself.


Major: “Regrettable, Herr Altmann, regrettable. I’m afraid they just don’t understand.”

Altmann: “No, they don’t. How could they. They were never soldiers like we were.”

Major: “Certain accommodations always had to be made.”


Scene: A Testifier seated at a large wooden table before a microphone. He gives testimony to a formal hearing.

Testifier: Yes Senator, that is correct. The United States Army Intelligence helped certain Nazi officers at the end of the war.


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