Arts & Entertainment - Articles

We've all experienced that wonderful feeling when we are in the presence of people and places that somehow make us feel like we belong. As children, our parents provide a secure, loving environment. They help, guide and hug us through whatever challenges life delivers. Their support provides the security and guidance that enables us to thrive as we ourselves grow into maturity.


For as long as I can remember, meals would always include a starch or a grain, Breakfast would be cereal—hot or cold—plus bread -- white or whole grain. Lunch would usually be a sandwich, hamburger, hot dogs or pizza and dinner would have rice or pasta in one of its many forms—macaroni, spaghetti, spirals, etc. What was a meal without bread or a starch?
Seemingly out of the blue, we are bombarded with the perils of eating gluten.


 If we can’t have Eliot Feld’s Ballet Tech back at the Joyce Theater, its former home, I guess we’ll have to settle for his Kids Dance, a program featuring forty or so ebullient students from Ballet Tech’s Public School for Dance.   Settling, it turns out, was actually hardly needed.  This was a thoroughly professional, vibrant show full of promise.


I never imagined that I would be viewed as a celebrity. I still can hardly believe it when people see me in public and actually scream, “Oh my God. It's Hattie!” As often as not, they hug and kiss me, tell me they love me and ask if I would take a picture with them. And this isn't a rare occurrence. A day doesn't pass without several people recognizing me, and excitedly expressing how thrilled they are to see a “real celebrity” in the flesh.


For years I would look at people, places and things, always finding fault. I would zero in on details that I believed should be different and wondered why they didn't correspond to what I believed was the “right” way. We often are told that age brings wisdom. Of course, with my obsession for being youthful, wisdom felt like a booby prize. Now, happily, that is no longer the case. It occurred to me that my style of seeing that things that should be done “my way” was robbing me of the opportunity to view life through the eyes of others.


A two-character exploration of disappointments, addiction, reconciliation and the healing power of art.


Now, at 77, looking back over my life, I remember times in which I felt that I could not go on. Most people view me as one of the happiest people they've ever known. They even dubbed me “Happy Hattie!” Yes, of course I've been happy.... gloriously so. But there's the flip side, depression. I suffer from that. It takes a lot to reveal that to you, but it's only fair to be open and truthful with my readers.


Simultaneously nurturing and gently admonishing, Tapp Francke’s latest solo exhibition at gallery nine5 "this is you" includes a back room installation that allows participants to fully absorb the all-encompassing power of color and self-reflection.


Architects Gordon Matta-Clark, Bill Owens, and James Howard Silvers' collective works represent a transitional period in American suburban life; a time when American consumerism was at its largest expansion and postwar suburban fantasy collided with the reality of gas shortages, "stagflation," and a growing unease with the isolation associated with "bedroom communities". The work of these artists and architects is part of a moment when conformity and the established order were being called into question on a mass scale as the "counter culture" movement of the sixties resonated with those affected by the faltering economy of the seventies.  At carriage trade Gallery through May 18th.


"Horizons," at the Cheryl Hazen Gallery, showcases three artists: Russell Sharon, Jeff Muhs, and Bradley Narduzzi Rex. The exhibit investigates the divergence of space and the significance of different elements coexisting harmoniously.