Arts & Entertainment - Articles

The Greenwich Village Antiquarian Book Fair celebrates its 36th year on Friday, February 20th through Sunday, February 22nd at P.S. 3 in the West Village.  The 3-day event offers both the serious bibliophile and the casual browser a delightful opportunity to peruse rare and vintage books! 


When the phrase “Holy Days” appears, it has a sombre quality. It elicits images of tranquil, serious contemplation – a time set aside to appreciate the gift of Life, and to clear one's soul of rancor and resentment. In direct contrast, the word, “Holiday” a clear derivative, brings forth visions of celebration, feasting ... PRESENTS!


It's thoroughly disgusting that companies invest millions for research on what consumers will believe, and BUY. Though their claims are usually false and misleading, which is bad enough, they often are outright DANGEROUS.


In The Last Ship rock star/actor/songwriter Sting honors his childhood home where shipbuilding was both the economic backbone, and the emotional sinew that kept the town together.  The show is a dark, but loving, paean to community and family, a Capra-esque, morality tale with characters who are either good—on the side of those wanting to build “the last ship”—or bad—those working for the evil capitalists who have bought the shipyard.


Terrence McNally’s It’s Only a Play is not one of his better efforts. In fact, it’s a terrible play! But, you know what? Who cares? When a show keeps you laughing for two and a half hours, fly to the theater, beg, borrow or steal tickets and indulge yourself! Theater mavens and drama queens might have a slight edge in getting the jokes, but there is enough brilliantly choreographed mayhem and pointed zingers to keep anyone rolling in the aisles. Add a world-class cast and it’s easy to see why this show, first staged in 1986, has become such a hit, tweaked and updated by Mr. McNally.


When I was a child (a hundred years ago), anyone who was overweight aimed for a 10 pound weight loss. That would have made a substantial difference, as no one I knew was obese. The Yiddish word “Zaftik” pretty much described a woman who, in those days, had some extra flesh, yet was sexy and in no way fat!


New Yorkers, come together and join New York City’s charitable, social and fashion communities for its annual Housing Works “Fashion for Action” event. Supported by hundreds of the fashion industry’s most influential designers, the event is an exclusive designer discount sale featuring a curated collection of sought after luxury brands. Proceeds from this charity event will support Housing Works’ youth outreach programming, which provides dedicated HIV-prevention and treatment services for young people living with HIV/AIDS or at-risk of infection.


The Barrington Stage Company production of On the Town has made it to Broadway, brilliantly expanded to fill the large Lyric Theater, losing none of its summer theater charm. What is the magic ingredient that makes this revival of On the Town so wonderful? 


As a grandmother, I'm mindful of the commonly held beliefs of how a “woman my age” should dress. But those rules won't apply to me. No longer will I avoid looking sexy in clothing worn by young women. In fact, as I pass through the interior of that humongous station, rather than being disdained, I'm admired. It feels wonderful to be photographed, praised, hugged by young people who are thrilled to see an older woman not afraid to be herself.


My Russian-born mother was 4'11” and wore a 4 ½ size shoe. Believe it or not, that was the sample size in the 1930s and 1940s. She prided herself on her dainty feet – the rest of her wasn't quite as dainty – as she found exquisite footwear that she felt proud to wear, and that was reasonably priced. In my teens, I was 5'4” weighed 125, and wore a size 61/2 shoe. It was looking as if each new generation was gaining inches on the preceding generation.