Arts & Entertainment - Articles

Now, at 77, looking back over my life, I remember times in which I felt that I could not go on. Most people view me as one of the happiest people they've ever known. They even dubbed me “Happy Hattie!” Yes, of course I've been happy.... gloriously so. But there's the flip side, depression. I suffer from that. It takes a lot to reveal that to you, but it's only fair to be open and truthful with my readers.


A two-character exploration of disappointments, addiction, reconciliation and the healing power of art.


Simultaneously nurturing and gently admonishing, Tapp Francke’s latest solo exhibition at gallery nine5 "this is you" includes a back room installation that allows participants to fully absorb the all-encompassing power of color and self-reflection.


Architects Gordon Matta-Clark, Bill Owens, and James Howard Silvers' collective works represent a transitional period in American suburban life; a time when American consumerism was at its largest expansion and postwar suburban fantasy collided with the reality of gas shortages, "stagflation," and a growing unease with the isolation associated with "bedroom communities". The work of these artists and architects is part of a moment when conformity and the established order were being called into question on a mass scale as the "counter culture" movement of the sixties resonated with those affected by the faltering economy of the seventies.  At carriage trade Gallery through May 18th.


"Horizons," at the Cheryl Hazen Gallery, showcases three artists: Russell Sharon, Jeff Muhs, and Bradley Narduzzi Rex. The exhibit investigates the divergence of space and the significance of different elements coexisting harmoniously.


It was decades ago that I became involved (read, obsessed) with dangerous chemicals in our food. I was one of the first people to call attention to the growing use of pesticides... and this was in the sixties! I headed up an Organic Food co-op called “The Greenhouse” composed of community-minded people from the the Upper West Side of Manhattan. Counted among our members were John Lennon, Yoko Ono and Gwen Verdon who joined me in my concern about the poisoning of our food supply.


The Art of Intelligence is part of our ongoing series committed to providing a venue for the creative talents among our Intelligence professionals who work to make our lives safer— and, whose families are often in need of assistance. You may contribute to those currently serving our country or to the families of fallen heroes at https://www.afio.com/donations.htm.


Alone in Triptych, by Renee Philippi, presented by the Concrete Temple Theatre at HERE is an odd attraction for this temple of the avant-garde. Alone is a straightforward, beautifully acted trilogy of intertwining solos. The title is a bit misleading since each of the three characters is at all times addressing an unseen person, the object of their obsessive attention.


The Art of Intelligence is part of our ongoing series committed to providing a venue for the creative talents among our Intelligence professionals who work to make our lives safer— and, whose families are often in need of assistance. "Rainy Street" is a poem by U.S. Army Intelligence Officer John W. Davis about his cousin, Pat, who will be forever eight years old. 


Clear as a bell I remember being taken to the Rivoli, a first-run movie palace on Broadway, to see the film Oklahoma! starring Gordon MacRae and Shirley Jones. Her freshness and lovely soprano was transporting. Seeing her so many years later onstage at the intimate, elegant Café Carlyle conjures the same thrill, her warmth and elegance filling the room. She began her show with a short video of her career, from musical theater ingénue to Academy Award winning prostitute to beloved sitcom mom.