Arts & Entertainment

Eleven days, thirty-five projects, and more than ninety artists... Experience intimate and provocative dance, music, visual art, and new media projects in public parks, in historic landmarks, on Governors Island and along the waterfront, for LMCC's13th annual festival. This year, the artists will respond to the architecture of some of New York City’s most iconic locations and hidden gems.

 If we can’t have Eliot Feld’s Ballet Tech back at the Joyce Theater, its former home, I guess we’ll have to settle for his Kids Dance, a program featuring forty or so ebullient students from Ballet Tech’s Public School for Dance.   Settling, it turns out, was actually hardly needed.  This was a thoroughly professional, vibrant show full of promise.


A new Spike TV show, “Frankenfood,” is hosting free food truck tastings in New York all of this week. The show combines unlikely foods in an attempt, that doesn’t always work, to create awesome new ideas—i.e. a spaghetti filled burger (it was very well received by attendees).


Originally scheduled to show in Rome in 2013, Si, quiero was prevented from being displayed when the Vatican threatened legal action. The Installation in the Window Gallery at the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art recreates Orquin’s photographs featuring same-sex couples kissing in Italian churches and is on view from the Museum’s street level Window Gallery 24 hours-a-day. Through June 24th.


“Me, My Mother, My Father, and I” will be the first New York museum exhibition (through June 29th) of Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson. Born into a family of actors and theater professionals, Kjartansson draws from a varied history of stage traditions, film, music, and literature. His performances, drawings, paintings, and video installations explore the boundary between reality and fiction as well as constructs of myth and identity.


I never imagined that I would be viewed as a celebrity. I still can hardly believe it when people see me in public and actually scream, “Oh my God. It's Hattie!” As often as not, they hug and kiss me, tell me they love me and ask if I would take a picture with them. And this isn't a rare occurrence. A day doesn't pass without several people recognizing me, and excitedly expressing how thrilled they are to see a “real celebrity” in the flesh.


When Debra Ehrhardt was an 18-year-old secretary in Kingston, Jamaica, she bumped into a handsome CIA agent over a bowl of oxtail soup. With the help of the love-struck American, she decided to squeeze through the pinhole of opportunity and out of Jamaica.  Her journey was blocked by many obstacles: an alcoholic father, a bible-spouting mother, the price of an airline ticket, and U.S. government suspicions.


Come see NYC Vocal and Songwriting Coach, Shelly Wade knock it out of the park with The Boys and Girls of Summer. Rookie and veteran singers of all ages also grace the stage, representing musical icons such as Sara Bareillas, Cole Porter, The Beatles, Bob Marley, and many more.

Shelly Wade Studios: The Boys and Girls of Summer
June 9, 6:00pm
Cabaret Theatre @ The Duplex
61 Chtistopher Street @ 7TH Avenue
Cover $10. 2 Drink Minimum per person
 

Beneath a glossy veneer is the stark reality of a world predicated on sadistic, exploitative, and parasitic dynamics.


Join Gabrielle Seltz TODAY for a reading and discussion from her new book with the great Frederic Tuten, author, most recently, of Self-Portraits: Fictions. In 1958, Selz moved to New York, where her father, Peter Selz, would begin his job as the chief curator of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art. He would carry on to champion a generation of modern artists, some the most celebrated of the day: Rothko, de Kooning, and Tinguely.


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