Arts & Entertainment

We, The Outsiders brings together works by an international quartet of artists, and will be on view through October 31. It’s an art exhibition that explores several perplexing questions: “Can it be said that art has a consciousness of its own? And if such a consciousness were independent of us, where would it place us in relation to itself?” The exhibition revolves around a gigantic egg—which probes, like the classic chicken-and-the-egg conundrum where consciousness begins and ends when it comes to art.


We laughed at her face with its countless surgeries. But mostly we laughed at her wild and wonderful humor. This courageous woman stopped at nothing to have us convulsing with laughter.She was never concerned about being judged as corny, ridiculous, sacrilegious, inappropriate, insulting and even disgusting and repulsive. Yes, she faced all this derision, but kept on delivering the goods. It was never the audience's judgment that concerned her. All she wanted to do was make us laugh. And that she did!


KITEYA is known for featuring items that demonstrate the craftsmanship, aesthetic, and artistry of both traditional and modern Japanese culture. Their latest exhibit, featuring the calligraphy works of Yasuko Kuboyama, is no exception. Born in Fukuoka, Japan, Ms. Kuboyama has made a name for herself with her bold, creative calligraphy and large-scale works. The exhibit (September 28 - October 27) will kick off with a special reception on October 1st at 5pm, featuring a raffle, a calligraphy performance by Yasuko Kuboyama, and refreshments by Sennari, Sanseido Honpo, and Ureshi no Cha.


 

While residing in a post-World War II displaced persons camp in 1945, a Ukrainian refugee by the name of Ihor Shevchenko discovered George Orwell's anti-communist novel, Animal Farm, and was fascinated by its message. With Orwell's permission and encouragement, he translated the book into Ukrainian under the pseudonym Ivan Cherniatynskyi and published it for distribution to other refugees. This story, and its aftermath, is told by Andrea Chalupa in her book Orwell and the Refugees: The Untold Story of Animal Farm.  Meet Andrea Chalupa on November 15th. She will speak about her book, life in the DP camps, Ihor Shevchenko, and George Orwell. Copies will be available for purchase and signing by the author. 

 


Over the past three years a small community of introspective frontier feminists have been gathering on intensive retreats to discuss and dissect the tenets of what it means to be a modern feminist. Presented by The Hole, “Future Feminism” is an exhibition collectively realized by Antony, Kembra Pfahler, Johanna Constantine, Bianca Casady and Sierra Casady. It realizes their reflective journeys into 13 tenets, articulating their meditations on modern feminist thinking. (Running September 11—27, 2014)


Human to human we all need to understand, empathize and support the choices of others, however painful. Admittedly, he killed himself to find peace. Would that he chose to publicly share his anguish allowing us to release him with a loving, understanding final farewell.


On exhibition through September 6, “Iowa, Ohio,” by Scott Daniel Elliso coincides with the release of the artist’s first monograph of the same name. The works, idiosyncratic photographs and paintings, imagine macabre vignettes inspired in equal parts by Scandinavian folklore, obscure horror films, and childhood fears and preoccupations.


 
The "Karaoke Play" opening on August 29th, is a piece about pop music, love and apathy. Three characters in a karaoke room rail against the world, and mourn the big, bold, important lives they were supposed to live, drowning their sorrows in booze, song, sex and cigarettes.

The latest bizarre example of age prejudice— AGEISM—surfaced at JFK when I was passing through security. The guards told me that I didn't have to take off my boots because I was a senior. While I was delighted not to have to go through the machinations of removing them, it hit me that it was, in fact, not a benefit, but an insult


Out of approximately five hundred submissions from talented, unaffiliated artists in all the boroughs, Denise Bibro Fine Art narrowed the pool to eighty artists. Subsequently, they pounded the pavement and visited studios in Williamsburg, by the water in Redhook, the old Army Terminal in Gowanus, Bedford-Stuyvesant, Long Island City, Harlem, Inwood, and the Lower East Side (just to name a few), and finally selected fifty three artists. These fifty-plus artists’ works are diverse in mediums, aesthetics, and content.


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