Community New & Politics - Articles

Who could have ever believed that Hattie, a dance teacher originally from Williamsburg, Brooklyn would emerge, in her 70's as a desired and desirable world-renowned role model? Certainly not me, a woman who has despised and disrespected aging for decades.


Jenifer Rajkumar is a lawyer, a District Leader, a Democrat who espouses early, direct, personal involvement in the community’s political decisions for her district, District 1 in SoHo. While Jenifer, who is also a member of the Downtown Independent Democrats, realizes that unseating an incumbent is an uphill battle, she is a determined and politically attractive candidate who is in this race for the right reasons. Not for power, not for self-aggrandizement, and not for provincial attempts to make small changes. Her desire is to fundamentally alter the way politics is managed. That is, by involving the community at the very outset in dealing with any changes that affect it. For changes that affect SoHo.


In my day, which we all know was a long time ago. people routinely took baths. And it wasn't just women... guys did too! I'm a fish out of water if I don't swim or bath/soak. Sure a shower provides a splash of clean, refreshing water. But though it can boost our spirits, readying us for the day ahead, or making us feel clean as we go to bed, it doesn't provide the benefits of soaking in a tub.


While affordable housing is a hot-button issue in many communities, nowhere is it more critical than downtown Manhattan. The numbers are frightening unless you’re a landlord.

Councilmember Margaret Chin was elected, in part, for her housing activism – as she had demonstrated in her primary constituency of Chinatown– to protect rent-regulated tenants.

Council Speaker Christine Quinn’s work has benefitted the community with her advocacy - supporting tenant rights in the face of landlord abuse and harassment.


There was more than one Joe Gallo in Brooklyn. There was, of course Crazy Joe Gallo, and, there was just Joe Gallo. Not the same guy. Yet, he died the same way. A bullet. In this case a bullet to the back of the head, found leaning back in his Buick where a headrest might be found in today’s cars. GM didn’t offer headrests in those days—or seat belts. Everyone drove at their own risk, until too many people went through the windshield. It was a pre-Ralph Nader world.


I've been dating and sleeping with men under 35 for over 24 years. It all started after my divorce in 1984, which was followed by a two year stint with an “age appropriate” man. After leaving him, I subtracted the 25 years that I was married from my true age – 52 – and began dating guys under 35 exclusively.


There has been much hand wringing over a few “Matters-SoHo” lately. Among these are the difficulties that have arisen over the BID proposed on Broadway that threatens to bring even more tourists to the area, to the consternation of many residents. Councilmember Margaret Chin has finally shown her hand and has come out in support of the BID, something suspected but not known for certain as much waffling had been reported.


 New York’s response to the storm has exposed deep inequality across the city, the letter states. In the storm’s aftermath, under-resourced communities were exposed to the most risk of prolonged damage: low-income people who work low-wage and hourly jobs, residents of public housing, those who lack access to safety nets, and New Yorkers barred from public relief and other opportunities due to their citizenship status. Many communities remained without heat or power for more than a month after the storm hit. ss. 


Facing another passing year, aging can loom as a scary possibility. Fear that time will rob us of the attributes of youth can be pretty depressing. To get myself past these times, I reach for a Hattietude. They serve as “booster shots” to help me overcome my fears and generate renewed optimism. Here are 20 of my favorites which I hope will help you overcome whatever aging fears you may face in 2013.


Food waste is a huge issue in America, especially in light of the growing divide between the profligate rich and the hungry poor. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Loss Project, we throw away more than 25 percent—some 25.9 million tons—of all the food we produce for domestic sale and consumption. A 2004 University of Arizona study pegs the figure at closer to 50 percent, finding that Americans squander some $43 billion annually on wasted food.