Content posted by Soho Journal Staff

For one week only (December 15 – 21) at the Film Forum you can watch the meteoric rise and fall of Jean-Michel Basquiat, born 1960. In the crime-ridden NYC of the 1970s, he covers the city with the graffiti tag SAMO. In 1981 he puts paint on canvas for the first time, and by 1983 he is an artist with “rock star status.” In 1985 he and Andy Warhol become close friends and painting collaborators, but they part ways and Warhol dies suddenly in 1987. Basquiat’s heroin addiction worsens, and he dies of an overdose in 1988. The artist was 25 years old at the height of his career, and today his canvases sell for more than a million dollars.


"Even with her lack of qualifications, Cathie Black received the wavier to become the school's next chancellor. Apparently, the countless voices of parents, students, teachers, and local residents don't matter to Commissioner Steiner. The Commissioner's own advisory panel voted  to deny Black the wavier and they were also ignored."


As part of our “Art of Intelligence” series we have been collecting poems, prose, art and more from former and current intelligence officers. The following poem is written by John W. Davis, an Intelligence Officer with the US Army.


Opening Saturday, December 4, 6 - 10 PM Tally Beck Contemporary will present an exhibition by Chinese artist Chen Ping. The exhibition, entitled Confucius—Other Realities, is comprised of Chen Ping’s signature oil paintings in which he plays on the border of representation and abstraction. He conjures ancient Chinese poetry while commenting on China’s rapid development. His deft coloration and impasto lend profound depth and texture to the canvases while adding intense dramatic effect.


Opening Tuesday November 23rd Laura Lobdell’s Traces of Color, an exhibition of recent paintings on paper. Lobdell’s gouache paintings are layered meditations on time.


New York Civic, a nonpartisan good government group founded by former NYC Parks Commissioner Henry J. Stern, will announce Monday morning on the steps of City Hall that it will pursue a public referendum to eliminate the controversial “grandfather” clause of the recently passed term limits ballot question, which delays the effective date of the law until 2021 and exempts 34 city incumbents from being restricted to two consecutive terms.


A letter from and Andrew Berman, Executive Director of the Greenwich Village Society of Historic Preservation:

NYU is dropping its application for landmarks approval for a 400 ft. tall tower on Bleeker Street in Silver Towers.  As you know, there was overwhelming opposition to this plan at our recent rally and the Community Board hearing, including most recently from I.M. Pei, the architect of Silver Towers.  That the university has decided to shelve this plan is incredible news, and a fantastic victory for all of our efforts.

New York’s cavernous allure has always rested on it’s past; a history that was sometimes illustrious but most often grim and persevering. On the Bowery, winner ofBest Documentary from the Venice Film Festival and Oscar nominated for Best Documentary Feature, is back by popular demand for one week only (November 19th – 25th) at the New York Film Forum. It is the story of the New York side of a post-war city, something unique to only us. Dark, sharp and beautiful it captures the essence of a time that explains why our City’s notoriety is not accidental, but well earned.


Opening Thursday, November 18th from 6 to 8 pm, Pratt Manhattan Gallery presents a group exhibition, Blind Dates: New Encounters from the Edges of a Former Empire, guest-curated by Defne Ayas and Neery Melkonian.


New York City Comptroller John C. Liu, on behalf of the trustees of the New York City Pension Funds, is calling on directors at Bank of America Corporation (NYSE: BAC), Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC), JPMorgan Chase & Co. (NYSE: JPM) and Citigroup Inc. (NYSE: C) to conduct an independent audit of their banks’ mortgage and foreclosure practices. The four banks are the largest mortgage servicers in the country representing 56 percent of the nation’s $10.64 trillion mortgage industry.