News & Politics

The changes that are made or not made, the historic sites that are preserved, and the construction projects that are prevented—all of this is the result of the tireless hours of unglamorous and often unrecognized work put in by (formerly) anonymous faces.

It is difficult for most of us to believe that we now may be looking over the precipice.  A series of Doom and Gloom pieces published here were somewhat unpleasant— but now there is the real prospect of a very serious drop brought on, perpetuated by a deflationary spiral. If you’re out of work in the Hamptons and you’ve been trying to figure out what to do next, there is no surprise about what’s out there.

"The Department of Buildings is about to change the Rules of New York City to allow developers to build illegally anywhere in the city."


The economy is not the only thing to take a hit because of the recession.  According to a report released February 20th Mayor Bloomberg’s approval ratings have dropped 7% since November, bringing it to the lowest ratings since June of 2005.


City Council Speaker Christine Quinn held a fundraiser Tuesday night to support her bid for re-election later this year. Over a hundred supporters gathered at a swanky Jane Street location to contribute to her upcoming campaign.


She has become the darling of the "Hate Party of America," a blonde dragon lady who sells venom at lucrative prices then slouches towards the nearest bank, laughing all the way.

Ann Coulter, a take-no-prisoners author of the far right, has converted her vitriol into huge capital gains by churning out best-selling (if often hysterical) books, writing mean-spirited columns, and making outrageous speeches before hate crowds that adore her.


As the Monty Python players famously remarked, “No one ever expects the Spanish Inquisition.” Similarly, in the Hamptons economy, which is driven by real estate, no one ever expected the kind of financial problems like those in California and Kansas. Still fewer expect the kind of dire financial problems about to hit.

Very Young Girls examines the exploitation of underage girls who are forced, bullied and coerced into prostitution. Most girls start between the ages of twelve and fourteen and are usually taken in by pimps who present themselves as both boyfriends and father figures, only to turn the girls out on the street a week or two after meeting them. David Schisgall's documentary is clearly swimming in dark waters, and you'd be forgiven for not rushing to watch a movie about such depressing subject matter. But skipping this film for CSI reruns would be a big mistake.


The District 3 City Council seat has been a source of intense scrutiny. From prior to the Term Limits speculation about candidates, which had Brad Hoylman running against Andrew Berman and Maria Derr tagging along, we now have Christine Quinn back in the mix with Derr still tagging along. Various stragglers are in tow but, mainly, it is Quinn.


 

Pete Gleason describes his views on the board game he helped create which underscores the lack of support from politicians for those directly impacted by the 9/11 terror attacks.


Syndicate content